Eastern Student Leadership Candidate

Courtney Dunn
Candidate for Eastern Student Representative, 2014-2015
Junior, Theta Kappa Chapter, Bloomsburg University
Bloomsburg, PA

Positions, other memberships, offices, etc., currently or recently held:

Explain why you are running for office and comment on any skills, experience, or personal qualities you possess that would contribute to your performing the following duties: promoting communication among chapters other than your own, producing official publications, assisting your Regent, serving on the Student Leadership Committee. Further comments or ideas are encouraged. Include your region and your first and last name at the top of the page. Please do not include sensitive personal information in your essay. Candidate essays will be displayed publicly before the election. Do not exceed 500 words:

I have decided to run for a student representative position for two specific reasons. The first reason I have decided to run is to gain the professional knowledge that is sure to accompany such a position. The second reason is to meet and connect with new people. Although I am currently involved in many organizations at my university, I recognize the benefits of expanding and meeting new people in new places.

Throughout my college career, I have held numerous student leadership positions pertaining to my Psychology and English majors. I have worked in the Psychology Department at Bloomsburg University for over two semesters. This position provides me with the opportunity to interact with students and faculty on a daily basis. This therefore allows me to gain experience communicating effectively and providing useful information in response to questions and concerns. Along with this job, I am an officer in the Psychology Association in which I assist in planning and facilitating numerous volunteer and group events. I also co-manage and update the Psychology Association Facebook page and therefore am responsible for informing fellow members about upcoming events and volunteer opportunities. Volunteering has been a passion of mine from the start of my college career, and so I enjoy getting other students involved. I have accumulated over seventy hours of community service during my college career. By getting involved with the community and campus organizations, I have not only learned how to be organized and prepared. I have learned how to care for others and help them reach their goals.

Along with volunteering and providing assistance for campus events, I am a GRE preparation program instructor. In this position, I am responsible for holding preparation classes and instructing students on how to improve their English and writing skills. I am also a writer for “The Voice”, the university newspaper. I have recently received my own column and put a lot of time and research into my articles in order to guarantee the validity of each piece. This position requires meeting deadlines, coming up with new material, and having a clear understanding of the needs and interests of college students. In addition to my articles published each week, I have had a piece published in “Warren”, the university literary journal. I will also be presenting a piece at the 2014 Sigma Tau Delta International Convention.

Over the past few years, I have gained a great amount of new knowledge and skills. I have learned to be organized and prepared for the benefit of a larger group. I have learned to communicate effectively with both students and faculty. I have even had the benefit of being published for a larger audience. By running for a student representative position, I am simply hoping for the opportunity to put these skills and this knowledge to use. By doing so, I hope to gain new experiences for myself as well as the people I am privileged to work with.

There is still time to apply for a student leadership position for any region. Simply bring your completed application form to the convention and turn it in at the convention registration desk any time before the Regional Networking meetings on Thursday afternoon. 

Eastern Student Leadership Candidate

Schollert head shotJeanette Schollaert
Candidate for Eastern Student Representative, 2014-2015
Junior, Alpha Delta Lambda Chapter, Chatham University
Pittsburgh, PA

Positions, other memberships, offices, etc., currently or recently held:

  • Founder and President, Beyond the Page Book Club (May 2012 – Present)
  • Humanities Tutor, Chatham University PACE Center (August 2012 – December 2013)
  • Vice-President, Sigma Tau Delta Alpha Delta Lambda Chapter (April 2013 – Present)
  • Executive Vice-President, Chatham College for Women Student Government (April 2013 – Present)
  • Social Committee Chair, Chatham Scholars Advisory Board (Fall 2013 – Present)
  • Late Night and Traditions Coordinator, Chatham University Office of Student Affairs (October 2013 – Present)

Explain why you are running for office and comment on any skills, experience, or personal qualities you possess that would contribute to your performing the following duties: promoting communication among chapters other than your own, producing official publications, assisting your Regent, serving on the Student Leadership Committee. Further comments or ideas are encouraged. Include your region and your first and last name at the top of the page. Please do not include sensitive personal information in your essay. Candidate essays will be displayed publicly before the election. Do not exceed 500 words:

I am running for Student Representative of the Eastern Region in order to build connections and collaboration throughout the region to foster a more engaged community. My experience as Vice-President of the Alpha Delta Lambda chapter at Chatham University has greatly inspired my desire to expand the connections between chapters. As Vice-President, I assisted in organizing the fourth annual Revise the World Carson conference at Chatham University this past fall. Although the conference was a success, greater participation in the Eastern Region could better improve chapter relations resulting in increased support of fellow society members’ events. In addition to the Revise the World conference, I encouraged submissions to the international convention through classroom visits and advertising, as well as implemented member recruitment strategies to grow the Chatham chapter into a more vibrant community.

I believe I have the experience necessary to facilitate community growth on a regional level. Beyond my involvement in the Sigma Tau Delta chapter, I also serve as Executive Vice-President of Chatham Student Government as well as founder and President of Chatham’s Beyond the Page Book Club, a student organization designed to foster community among Humanities majors and book lovers across disciplines. Through these endeavors, I have planned various events such as monthly student organization advocacy forums, two annual Banned Book Week celebrations featuring insightful speakers, volunteering at the Squirrel Hill Carnegie Library’s Read Across America and Halloween celebrations, as well as book drives with Better World Books. It is through the Book Club that Chatham began its relationship with Better World Books, hosting two drives during the 2012-2013 school year that yielded enthusiastic results. After my induction to Sigma Tau Delta last spring, I learned of the honors society’s partnership with the Better World Books organization, and began plans to expand the book drive to encourage maximum participation. As a result, this spring, Chatham will sponsor a drive that includes not just the Book Club and the university’s Sigma Tau Delta chapter, but also the Creative Writing Club, collaborating to further the progress of a mission dear to each literary organization.

After a successful year of chapter leadership, I hope to continue working for this organization that provides such valuable opportunities for students. Be it a trip to Savannah to connect with members from across the country, presenting a critical work in front of peers and professors at a local conference, or donating books to advance literacy and sustainability on a global scale, Sigma Tau Delta is committed to encouraging the absolute best from its members while stressing a collaborative spirit. I hope to continue this mission as a Student Representative for the Eastern region, furthering greater chapter relationships to produce a more synergized region of the society.

There is still time to apply for a student leadership position for any region. Simply bring your completed application form to the convention and turn it in at the convention registration desk any time before the Regional Networking meetings on Thursday afternoon. 

Submitting to Journals

Lyndon Seitzby Lyndon Seitz
Eastern Student Representative, 2013-2014
Westfield State University, Westfield, MA

This is the second of a two-part post. Part one focused on how to find a journal to which to submit.

Once you have found a journal to which you want to submit, you may wonder what to do next. Here are a few tips that will help you submit your work properly and avoid any problems:

  • Remember to read and follow the guidelines carefully. Policies vary from journal to journal and what is right for one journal could get you disqualified from another. Make sure file names, file types, and email subject lines are all formatted exactly as instructed.
  • A number of journals (including Sigma Tau Delta’s Rectangle and Review) use online submissions instead of asking for submissions by email. Some use their own custom websites, others use sites such as Submittable. Online submissions may seem daunting at first but I’ve generally found they are easier than email submissions.
  • Cover letters are in many cases the first thing the editor reads. You will want to leave a good first impression. I like this simple guide that I found. In many cases, the worst thing you can do is overthink it.
  • It might be a good idea to create a modifiable cover letter template if you are sending out a lot of submissions. If you do, carefully review each letter to make sure everything is appropriately modified for the intended recipient.
  • Double check everything. If you have a difficult time proofreading your own work  (as I do), take even a quick break and come back to it. It will still be there for you when you return.
  • Try not to submit at the very last minute. You do not want to rush yourself.
  • A short bio is usually required at some point in the submissions process, and it can be a little tricky. Luckily, you have a massive wealth of examples waiting for you in all the bios that have been published before you. Use them as a guide and don’t be discouraged by the publishing credits you see in them. Every writer has to start somewhere.
  • Simultaneous submissions are when you submit a piece to more than one place at a time. Some places allow them, others do not. If you do simultaneous submissions, you absolutely must let the other places where you submitted know if your poem has been accepted elsewhere.
  • You are going to want to have some way to keep track of your submissions. When you get to the point where you have a dozen poems or stories out at once, you will find that you simply cannot do it in your head anymore. I recommend keeping an Excel chart with different columns based on your needs.

You may not get accepted the first time. Don’t let this discourage you. The acceptance rate of most journals is very low–often less than five percent. If your work isn’t accepted it doesn’t mean it is bad so much as that it doesn’t fit what the editors are looking for. Try again in a different journal, perhaps after some revision. Persistence pays off.